Sisters schools honored local veterans with their annual assemblies at all three schools. The Sisters High School assembly took place on Wednesday November 9 in the auditorium, with the entire student body and teachers present, as well as 15 local veterans from different branches of the military, who sat in the front to be recognized.

The assembly, which is put on by the Associated Student Government (ASG) every year, included a video message from staff and students about what veterans mean to them and why they are thankful to them. Many students echoed their gratefulness to veterans for fighting for their freedoms, and for care they have for their country.

In the video message, teacher Daniel O’Neill said: “The cost is heavy, but it is well worth it, and I appreciate what our veterans have done, and my heart goes out to service members and their families.”

The assembly began with a performance of the National Anthem from the SHS Jazz Choir led by Rick Johnson and accompanied by Julie Cash. Band student Dominic Martinez performed “Taps,” honoring those who have fallen. The concert choir then recognized all branches of the military accompanied by the band, in their performance of “A Tribute to the Armed Services (arranged by Lloyd Larson).” Members of the Central Oregon Band of Brothers were in attendance, and all echoed praises for school leadership: “We are always so impressed by the leadership and this assembly here at SHS.”

During the assembly, the school honored SHS students/graduates who currently serve, or previously served in the military.

Earl Schroeder, a U.S. Air Force veteran, was the keynote speaker for the assembly this year. He served during the Cold War era, and spent eight years at six different radar sites, with his last location being North Bend, Oregon, which is why he ended up landing in Oregon. Schroeder has lived in Sisters for the past 15 years. His speech was a poem titled “What Is a Veteran?”

The assembly wrapped up with the “Missing Man Table,” which is a table set to honor those who are either Missing in Action (MIA) or a Prisoner of War (POW). Students had read about this tradition for honoring POWs and MIAs. The table is set for one, to represent Americans who were or are missing from each of the five branches. The table is round to show everlasting concern, with white cloth symbolizing the purity of their motives when answering the call to serve. Students played out the many elements of the traditional honoring service. There was then a moment of silence for all those who are POW/MIA.

ASG students finished the assembly by thanking and honoring the veterans in attendance. Students at Sisters Middle School honored veterans later that day.